Editorial: Overcoming Consumer Challenges in Sunscreen Selection

Main Article Content

Alex M Glazer
Ryan M Svoboda
Rebeca W Teplitz
Darrell S Rigel

Keywords

sunscreen, SPF, recommendations, photoprotection, patient safety, safety

Abstract

Abstract not available

References

1. Svoboda RM, Teplitz RW, Farberg AS, Rigel DS. Patient and consumer knowledge of sunscreen labeling terminology: a cross-sectional survey. Manuscript in preparation.

2. EWG’s Guide to Sunscreens http://www.ewg.org/sunscreen/ accessed June 17, 2017.

3. Kroll D. “The Failure of Jessica Alba’s Honest Sunscreen Explained”. Forbes. August 3 2015. https://www.forbes.com/sites/davidkroll/2015/08/03/the-failure-of-jessica-albas-honest-company-sunscreen-explained/#57c2df8d3483. Accessed June 19 2017.

4. Wang SQ, Burnett ME, Lim HW. Safety of oxybenzone: putting numbers into perspective. Arch Dermatol. 2011;147(7):865-866.
5. Wang SQ, Douza SW, Lim HW. Safety of retinyl palmitate in sunscreens: a critical analysis. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2011;63(5):903-906.

6. Williams JD, Maitra P, Atillasoy E, Wu MM, Farberg AS, Rigel DS. SPF 100+ sunscreen is more protective against sunburn than SPF 50+ in actual-use: Results of a randomized, double-blind, split-face, natural sunlight exposure, clinical trial. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2017.

7. Ou-Yang H, Stanfield J, Cole C, Appa Y, Rigel D. High-SPF sunscreens (SPF >/= 70) may provide ultraviolet protection above minimal recommended levels by adequately compensating for lower sunscreen user application amounts. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2012;67(6):1220-1227.

8. Consumer Reports Sunscreen Buying Guide http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/sunscreens/buying-guide.htm accessed June 17, 2017.

9. Why some people worry that sunscreen might be bad for you Popular Science http://www.popsci.com/sunscreen-harmful accessed June 14, 2017.

10. Cole C, Appa Y, Ou-Yang H. A broad spectrum high-SPF photostable sunscreen with high UVA-PF can protect against cellular damage at high UV exposure doses. Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed. 2014;30(4):212-219.



11. Liebel F, Kaur S, Ruvolo E, et al. Irradiation of skin with visible light induces reactive oxygen species and matrix-degrading enzymes. J Invest Dermatol. 2012;132(7):1901-1907.

12. Seité S, Moyal D, Verdier MP, et al. Accumulated p53 protein and UVA protection level of sunscreens. Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed. 2000;16(1):3-9.

13. Mancuso JB, Maruthi R, Wang SQ, et al. Sunscreens: an update. Am J Clin Dermatol. 2017; May 16. doi: 10.1007/s40257-017-0290-0. [Epub ahead of print]

14. Green AC, Williams GM, Logan V, et al. Reduced melanoma after regular sunscreen use: randomized trial follow-up. J Clin Oncol. 2011;29(3):257-263.

15. Olsen CM, Wilson LF, Green AC, et al. Cancers in Australia attributable to exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation and prevented by regular sunscreen use. Aust N Z J Public Health. 2015;39(4):471-476.

16. Ghiasvand R, Weiderpass E, Green AC, et al. Sunscreen use and subsequent melanoma risk: a population-based cohort study. J Clin Oncol. 2016; Sep 12. Doi: 10.1200/JCO.2016.67.5934 [Epub ahead of print]

17. Olsen CM, Wilson LF, Green AC, Biswas N, Loyalka J, Whiteman DC. How many melanomas might be prevented if more people applied sunscreen regularly? British J Dermatol. 2018;178(1):140-147.